Wellness Scout

Challenge - 3 Liters a Day! It works.

I've heard my often mom say, "drink before you are thirsty."
She’s right-- this is true!

Last fall, I was looking for a way to drink more water and snack less when I stumbled upon the following article about drinking three liters of water a day. To give you an idea, a liter is the size of one of those Poland Spring sparkling bottles or large Perrier bottles. Most water bottles are either .5 or .75 liters.

At first, I thought this technique was a gimmick, but as I read further, I figured I should try and experience it for myself. Water is an essential nutrient for our bodies and we are technically made up of 75% water so how could it hurt to try it? So, how did I accomplish this feat?

-
I bought a glass liter bottle from Whole Foods and after finishing the contents, I kept refilling at work throughout the day.
- Every time I felt like snacking, I took a sip of water.
- Every time I got up from my desk, I took a sip of water.
- I took a few gulps before lunch and had a sip between every few bites of lunch.

- I set a goal of drinking one liter by 11:00, then another by 3pm, and the last liter within the last couple hours of work.

If I didn't finish, it wasn't terrible since I knew I had at least a glass before work and would have another when I arrived home. However, I didn't bank on this pre and post work water routine just in case I ended up drinking less away from work. So I always tried to drink three full liters of water while at work.

Results? Other than going to the bathroom more (which actually was great for mini stretches throughout the day), I felt more hydrated and never thirsty. I didn't snack as much as I usually did and I ate slower at lunch. I also noticed that my skin appeared clearer and I found my overall ability to think was better. I also realized there were times I was snacking that in actuality were cravings due to dehydration (any degree of thirst).


If drinking water is an "effort" for you or you don't like the "taste" (or lack thereof), then I suggest the following:
 -
Slowly incorporate water into your day. Have the refillable bottle by your desk. Set yourself up for success with the appropriate tools; as you would with any project at work.
- Order water in addition to your usual restaurant drink or in lieu of it. Try doing this at one meal per day for two weeks. Increase to two meals once you notice it’s a habit or after a month.
- For those who need more oomph in their water, try sparkling either flavored, plain or with lime, lemon, or cucumber. If flavored water is the only way you’ll down a glass, then your taste buds are too accustomed to sweet, salty drinks and you may need to train your body to enjoy the replenishment satisfaction vs the taste.
- DO NOT: use those chemical taste enhancers – drops, packet additives, etc. Try natural additives as much as possible or sparkling water. 


Also, set a finite duration to the challenge. That way, you won’t feel stuck by it if the notion of a permanent change is interfering with the implementation of the challenge. During the process, you may find the benefits outweigh the previous aversions to drinking water and the habit will become natural.


Try it! What have you got to loose?

Wellness Scout

Challenge - 3 Liters a Day! It works.

I've heard my often mom say, "drink before you are thirsty."
She’s right-- this is true!

Last fall, I was looking for a way to drink more water and snack less when I stumbled upon the following article about drinking three liters of water a day. To give you an idea, a liter is the size of one of those Poland Spring sparkling bottles or large Perrier bottles. Most water bottles are either .5 or .75 liters.

At first, I thought this technique was a gimmick, but as I read further, I figured I should try and experience it for myself. Water is an essential nutrient for our bodies and we are technically made up of 75% water so how could it hurt to try it? So, how did I accomplish this feat?

-
I bought a glass liter bottle from Whole Foods and after finishing the contents, I kept refilling at work throughout the day.
- Every time I felt like snacking, I took a sip of water.
- Every time I got up from my desk, I took a sip of water.
- I took a few gulps before lunch and had a sip between every few bites of lunch.

- I set a goal of drinking one liter by 11:00, then another by 3pm, and the last liter within the last couple hours of work.

If I didn't finish, it wasn't terrible since I knew I had at least a glass before work and would have another when I arrived home. However, I didn't bank on this pre and post work water routine just in case I ended up drinking less away from work. So I always tried to drink three full liters of water while at work.

Results? Other than going to the bathroom more (which actually was great for mini stretches throughout the day), I felt more hydrated and never thirsty. I didn't snack as much as I usually did and I ate slower at lunch. I also noticed that my skin appeared clearer and I found my overall ability to think was better. I also realized there were times I was snacking that in actuality were cravings due to dehydration (any degree of thirst).


If drinking water is an "effort" for you or you don't like the "taste" (or lack thereof), then I suggest the following:
 -
Slowly incorporate water into your day. Have the refillable bottle by your desk. Set yourself up for success with the appropriate tools; as you would with any project at work.
- Order water in addition to your usual restaurant drink or in lieu of it. Try doing this at one meal per day for two weeks. Increase to two meals once you notice it’s a habit or after a month.
- For those who need more oomph in their water, try sparkling either flavored, plain or with lime, lemon, or cucumber. If flavored water is the only way you’ll down a glass, then your taste buds are too accustomed to sweet, salty drinks and you may need to train your body to enjoy the replenishment satisfaction vs the taste.
- DO NOT: use those chemical taste enhancers – drops, packet additives, etc. Try natural additives as much as possible or sparkling water. 


Also, set a finite duration to the challenge. That way, you won’t feel stuck by it if the notion of a permanent change is interfering with the implementation of the challenge. During the process, you may find the benefits outweigh the previous aversions to drinking water and the habit will become natural.


Try it! What have you got to loose?

Wellness Scout

Challenge - 3 Liters a Day! It works.

I've heard my often mom say, "drink before you are thirsty."
She’s right-- this is true!

Last fall, I was looking for a way to drink more water and snack less when I stumbled upon the following article about drinking three liters of water a day. To give you an idea, a liter is the size of one of those Poland Spring sparkling bottles or large Perrier bottles. Most water bottles are either .5 or .75 liters.

At first, I thought this technique was a gimmick, but as I read further, I figured I should try and experience it for myself. Water is an essential nutrient for our bodies and we are technically made up of 75% water so how could it hurt to try it? So, how did I accomplish this feat?

-
I bought a glass liter bottle from Whole Foods and after finishing the contents, I kept refilling at work throughout the day.
- Every time I felt like snacking, I took a sip of water.
- Every time I got up from my desk, I took a sip of water.
- I took a few gulps before lunch and had a sip between every few bites of lunch.

- I set a goal of drinking one liter by 11:00, then another by 3pm, and the last liter within the last couple hours of work.

If I didn't finish, it wasn't terrible since I knew I had at least a glass before work and would have another when I arrived home. However, I didn't bank on this pre and post work water routine just in case I ended up drinking less away from work. So I always tried to drink three full liters of water while at work.

Results? Other than going to the bathroom more (which actually was great for mini stretches throughout the day), I felt more hydrated and never thirsty. I didn't snack as much as I usually did and I ate slower at lunch. I also noticed that my skin appeared clearer and I found my overall ability to think was better. I also realized there were times I was snacking that in actuality were cravings due to dehydration (any degree of thirst).


If drinking water is an "effort" for you or you don't like the "taste" (or lack thereof), then I suggest the following:
 -
Slowly incorporate water into your day. Have the refillable bottle by your desk. Set yourself up for success with the appropriate tools; as you would with any project at work.
- Order water in addition to your usual restaurant drink or in lieu of it. Try doing this at one meal per day for two weeks. Increase to two meals once you notice it’s a habit or after a month.
- For those who need more oomph in their water, try sparkling either flavored, plain or with lime, lemon, or cucumber. If flavored water is the only way you’ll down a glass, then your taste buds are too accustomed to sweet, salty drinks and you may need to train your body to enjoy the replenishment satisfaction vs the taste.
- DO NOT: use those chemical taste enhancers – drops, packet additives, etc. Try natural additives as much as possible or sparkling water. 


Also, set a finite duration to the challenge. That way, you won’t feel stuck by it if the notion of a permanent change is interfering with the implementation of the challenge. During the process, you may find the benefits outweigh the previous aversions to drinking water and the habit will become natural.


Try it! What have you got to loose?

Wellness Scout

Choose a Challenge Over a Resolution!

As I write this while eating my veggie, quinoa and tofu salad (in lieu of a stuffed bread with savory chicken) and a raisin pecan roll (vs. a sweet roll dessert), I realize that in essence, I have embarked on the "New Year's Resolutions" slowly but without much thought. Why? Because I didn't set any resolutions. Instead I set a challenge. The word “challenge” versus the word “resolution” triggers different mindsets, which in turn, triggers different behaviors.


1) A “resolution” can have a negative impact on your psyche. It implies that for the last year, you have been doing something "bad" that needs to be changed. It falls along the lines of resolving to be better. A a result, you deny yourself of a food, an activity, or a behavior. For me denial means wanting the denied thing more. This immediately sets you up for failure if you don't meet your “resolution”.
2) A “challenge” implies that you are strong, determined, and wanting to positively make a change that will improve your skills, your health and your mental well-being or whatever you want to "improve". A challenge invokes a sense of competition (achieving), and it also restores trust in oneself.

Which sounds more positive and encouraging?
"Resolve to eat less sweets." "Resolve to not sit so much."  -- or --
"Challenge yourself to eat less sweets." "Challenge yourself to take a 20 minute walk every day."

When achieved, challenges feel more rewarding. This mindset is used a lot in physical goal making to motivate and persevere. Challenge yourself to workout outside of your comfort zone. Push yourself through the pain. Don't you feel more empowered when you achieve your challenge?

I consciously wasn't thinking about reducing sugar and eating a salad. I simply thought that I needed this for my body. I challenged myself to feed myself more nutritious, re-energizing food. I also chose to do it slowly with substitutions. Not cold turkey.

My next challenge is the Three Liter a Day Challenge. - the next challenge I will designate to meet my sustainable health goals.

Wellness Scout

Choose a Challenge Over a Resolution!

As I write this while eating my veggie, quinoa and tofu salad (in lieu of a stuffed bread with savory chicken) and a raisin pecan roll (vs. a sweet roll dessert), I realize that in essence, I have embarked on the "New Year's Resolutions" slowly but without much thought. Why? Because I didn't set any resolutions. Instead I set a challenge. The word “challenge” versus the word “resolution” triggers different mindsets, which in turn, triggers different behaviors.


1) A “resolution” can have a negative impact on your psyche. It implies that for the last year, you have been doing something "bad" that needs to be changed. It falls along the lines of resolving to be better. A a result, you deny yourself of a food, an activity, or a behavior. For me denial means wanting the denied thing more. This immediately sets you up for failure if you don't meet your “resolution”.
2) A “challenge” implies that you are strong, determined, and wanting to positively make a change that will improve your skills, your health and your mental well-being or whatever you want to "improve". A challenge invokes a sense of competition (achieving), and it also restores trust in oneself.

Which sounds more positive and encouraging?
"Resolve to eat less sweets." "Resolve to not sit so much."  -- or --
"Challenge yourself to eat less sweets." "Challenge yourself to take a 20 minute walk every day."

When achieved, challenges feel more rewarding. This mindset is used a lot in physical goal making to motivate and persevere. Challenge yourself to workout outside of your comfort zone. Push yourself through the pain. Don't you feel more empowered when you achieve your challenge?

I consciously wasn't thinking about reducing sugar and eating a salad. I simply thought that I needed this for my body. I challenged myself to feed myself more nutritious, re-energizing food. I also chose to do it slowly with substitutions. Not cold turkey.

My next challenge is the Three Liter a Day Challenge. - the next challenge I will designate to meet my sustainable health goals.

Wellness Scout

Choose a Challenge Over a Resolution!

As I write this while eating my veggie, quinoa and tofu salad (in lieu of a stuffed bread with savory chicken) and a raisin pecan roll (vs. a sweet roll dessert), I realize that in essence, I have embarked on the "New Year's Resolutions" slowly but without much thought. Why? Because I didn't set any resolutions. Instead I set a challenge. The word “challenge” versus the word “resolution” triggers different mindsets, which in turn, triggers different behaviors.


1) A “resolution” can have a negative impact on your psyche. It implies that for the last year, you have been doing something "bad" that needs to be changed. It falls along the lines of resolving to be better. A a result, you deny yourself of a food, an activity, or a behavior. For me denial means wanting the denied thing more. This immediately sets you up for failure if you don't meet your “resolution”.
2) A “challenge” implies that you are strong, determined, and wanting to positively make a change that will improve your skills, your health and your mental well-being or whatever you want to "improve". A challenge invokes a sense of competition (achieving), and it also restores trust in oneself.

Which sounds more positive and encouraging?
"Resolve to eat less sweets." "Resolve to not sit so much."  -- or --
"Challenge yourself to eat less sweets." "Challenge yourself to take a 20 minute walk every day."

When achieved, challenges feel more rewarding. This mindset is used a lot in physical goal making to motivate and persevere. Challenge yourself to workout outside of your comfort zone. Push yourself through the pain. Don't you feel more empowered when you achieve your challenge?

I consciously wasn't thinking about reducing sugar and eating a salad. I simply thought that I needed this for my body. I challenged myself to feed myself more nutritious, re-energizing food. I also chose to do it slowly with substitutions. Not cold turkey.

My next challenge is the Three Liter a Day Challenge. - the next challenge I will designate to meet my sustainable health goals.