Wellness Scout

"How can you NOT go to the gym"! - I get it. Do you?

When I was unmarried, without a daughter, I recall not understanding how a mom coworker couldn't make the time to go to the gym that was IN our office.
Now, married and with a 1 year old, I get it.

A year has almost passed since our daughter was born and I ask myself “Am I fully recovered? Is my husband?” Maternity coverage would have been over 9 months ago and I reflect on that time with a fog and haze. Does it really take 3 months for one to recover; physically, mentally, emotionally? I know that this 3 month maternity thing is a concept to return women to the work force to make money to keep up the cycle of buying. I know many woman don't have a choice on whether to return or not, but that’s not the argument I’m tackling here, rather is our body - in all forms and ways - “healed” after 3 months?

I can only talk about myself, so hopefully in doing so I'll spurn some questions about your own wellness recovery after a life changing event, trauma or even set back and the choices to get yourself back on track.

Physically I had a very intense labor - both types really – vaginal and cesarean. Even the nurse said, " You got the best of both" - jokingly of course. Prior to labor, I was in very good physical condition so I thought I would bounce back, be at the gym within 3 months and have my physical strength back with the hopeful added bonus of my physique despite breastfeeding.

Nope.

I underestimated birth, life, and my own state of mind.

I go to the gym maybe once or twice a week, but it’s not my priority and I find that going religiously isn’t necessary when not sitting at a desk all day. However, the last few months I have lost the last remaining bits of strength from my pre-pregnancy days which has resulted in more aches and pains. As the gym isn’t as feasible I’ve taken up some home workout videos (Jessica Smith TV). I despise exercising at home. Despise. However, I have mustered the motivation and found a video I like. Even my daughter has embraced it. So how can I not even try!


With a C -section it takes longer than expected to heal and varies for every woman. I was exercising on my own within the 3 month mark, however, now I understand why some things in the abs didn’t feel so good. Now my organs finally feel in place. A year later. Certain moves no longer feel odd nor have some aches a day later. Although, now I have to work harder on my abs to keep my strength up and back pain low. On the plus side, exercise through daily movement and actions has kept the need for the hamster wheel (gym machines) at a minimum. I have a little extra weight on me and I need to work on that strength and tone, but it will come. All in due time. Slowly. Organically. Naturally. When my body is ready.

This is the same emotionally, with self care, relationships with your spouse, your career - give everything time to understand the new you, adapt and modify to meet your new priorities.

My point? Priorities shift when your health has been adversely or traumatically affected so recognize when it is time to adapt. Use it as an excuse to figure out a new way to challenge your body, redefine it. Set new goals. But most of all, give yourself the break you deserve that it takes a year or more for a woman to “recover”...to feel herself physically. Mentally...that’s another story...ask me in 18 years.

Wellness Scout

"How can you NOT go to the gym"! - I get it. Do you?

When I was unmarried, without a daughter, I recall not understanding how a mom coworker couldn't make the time to go to the gym that was IN our office.
Now, married and with a 1 year old, I get it.

A year has almost passed since our daughter was born and I ask myself “Am I fully recovered? Is my husband?” Maternity coverage would have been over 9 months ago and I reflect on that time with a fog and haze. Does it really take 3 months for one to recover; physically, mentally, emotionally? I know that this 3 month maternity thing is a concept to return women to the work force to make money to keep up the cycle of buying. I know many woman don't have a choice on whether to return or not, but that’s not the argument I’m tackling here, rather is our body - in all forms and ways - “healed” after 3 months?

I can only talk about myself, so hopefully in doing so I'll spurn some questions about your own wellness recovery after a life changing event, trauma or even set back and the choices to get yourself back on track.

Physically I had a very intense labor - both types really – vaginal and cesarean. Even the nurse said, " You got the best of both" - jokingly of course. Prior to labor, I was in very good physical condition so I thought I would bounce back, be at the gym within 3 months and have my physical strength back with the hopeful added bonus of my physique despite breastfeeding.

Nope.

I underestimated birth, life, and my own state of mind.

I go to the gym maybe once or twice a week, but it’s not my priority and I find that going religiously isn’t necessary when not sitting at a desk all day. However, the last few months I have lost the last remaining bits of strength from my pre-pregnancy days which has resulted in more aches and pains. As the gym isn’t as feasible I’ve taken up some home workout videos (Jessica Smith TV). I despise exercising at home. Despise. However, I have mustered the motivation and found a video I like. Even my daughter has embraced it. So how can I not even try!


With a C -section it takes longer than expected to heal and varies for every woman. I was exercising on my own within the 3 month mark, however, now I understand why some things in the abs didn’t feel so good. Now my organs finally feel in place. A year later. Certain moves no longer feel odd nor have some aches a day later. Although, now I have to work harder on my abs to keep my strength up and back pain low. On the plus side, exercise through daily movement and actions has kept the need for the hamster wheel (gym machines) at a minimum. I have a little extra weight on me and I need to work on that strength and tone, but it will come. All in due time. Slowly. Organically. Naturally. When my body is ready.

This is the same emotionally, with self care, relationships with your spouse, your career - give everything time to understand the new you, adapt and modify to meet your new priorities.

My point? Priorities shift when your health has been adversely or traumatically affected so recognize when it is time to adapt. Use it as an excuse to figure out a new way to challenge your body, redefine it. Set new goals. But most of all, give yourself the break you deserve that it takes a year or more for a woman to “recover”...to feel herself physically. Mentally...that’s another story...ask me in 18 years.

Wellness Scout

Fat Doesn't Make You FAT!

Don't misunderstand your need for fat! In a nutrient dense diet, the fats found in natural, whole foods are needed to help your body function—especially your brain and intestines. Fats are necessary for insulation within in your body. They enable vitamin absorption and provide energy to the brain. So don’t fear fat!

We’ve all heard about heart healthy fats such as olive oils and avocados, but there are other important fats to include in your whole food diet:
  • Omega-3s - Found in fish, nuts, chia, and flaxseeds.
  •  Monounsaturated fats - Found in olive oil, nuts, and avocados.
  •  Saturated fats - Found in butter, eggs, and grass-fed animal protein. These fats are the most stable of all the fats. They are safe to cook with and do not go rancid easily. Refined and processed vegetable oils can have a toxic effect when cooked at a very high heat. Our bodies cant process these oils as efficiently as they can the natural oils found in butter, ghee, and coconut oil. 

If fat has all these benefits, how can it make you fat? It doesn't necessarily, which is hard to believe after reading and hearing alarming messaging about it for over 30 years.
Here are are a few reasons why fat is good for you: 
  • It assists with the slow entry time of refined carbohydrates, and keeps blood sugar levels even.
  • Vitamins A, D, and E are fat-soluble vitamins and along with calcium, need fat for absorption. Butter is a wonderful whole food as it contains these fat-soluble vitamins and the fat necessary for absorption. In fact, butter is far better for you and more nutritious than margarine or cream cheese.
  • Although fat has more calories, its satiating quality safe-guards against over eating (unless it’s coupled with sugar). Fat can lead to weight gain when it’s paired with sugar and refined grains. When you eat fat in large quantities it is often paired with sugar or refined carbs such as ice cream, cakes, cookies, donuts, and/or fries.
  • Fat in and of itself will be used by the body and has the least impact on insulin. A high fat diet that includes sugar and refined grains increases your insulin, which is the hormone controlling fat storage. Swings in your blood sugar lead to spikes in insulin, which ultimately effects how calories are stored as fat. Try to avoid the desserts that contain both sugar and fat since it’s the tastiness of that combination that is addictive and causes you to overeat. Instead, focus on eating fat found naturally in butter and other dairy and oils and I bet you won't overeat the fat. Some good snack options are a banana with peanut butter and nuts or whole wheat (spelt) toast with grass fed butter. Or try a full fat yogurt with some berries and local honey or homemade granola with grass fed cow or goat milk.

Focus on adding just enough fat to support your body and satisfy your appetite to keep the portion sizes and calories where they should be. In the end, fat won't make you fat! 

Wellness Scout

Fat Doesn't Make You FAT!

Don't misunderstand your need for fat! In a nutrient dense diet, the fats found in natural, whole foods are needed to help your body function—especially your brain and intestines. Fats are necessary for insulation within in your body. They enable vitamin absorption and provide energy to the brain. So don’t fear fat!

We’ve all heard about heart healthy fats such as olive oils and avocados, but there are other important fats to include in your whole food diet:
  • Omega-3s - Found in fish, nuts, chia, and flaxseeds.
  •  Monounsaturated fats - Found in olive oil, nuts, and avocados.
  •  Saturated fats - Found in butter, eggs, and grass-fed animal protein. These fats are the most stable of all the fats. They are safe to cook with and do not go rancid easily. Refined and processed vegetable oils can have a toxic effect when cooked at a very high heat. Our bodies cant process these oils as efficiently as they can the natural oils found in butter, ghee, and coconut oil. 

If fat has all these benefits, how can it make you fat? It doesn't necessarily, which is hard to believe after reading and hearing alarming messaging about it for over 30 years.
Here are are a few reasons why fat is good for you: 
  • It assists with the slow entry time of refined carbohydrates, and keeps blood sugar levels even.
  • Vitamins A, D, and E are fat-soluble vitamins and along with calcium, need fat for absorption. Butter is a wonderful whole food as it contains these fat-soluble vitamins and the fat necessary for absorption. In fact, butter is far better for you and more nutritious than margarine or cream cheese.
  • Although fat has more calories, its satiating quality safe-guards against over eating (unless it’s coupled with sugar). Fat can lead to weight gain when it’s paired with sugar and refined grains. When you eat fat in large quantities it is often paired with sugar or refined carbs such as ice cream, cakes, cookies, donuts, and/or fries.
  • Fat in and of itself will be used by the body and has the least impact on insulin. A high fat diet that includes sugar and refined grains increases your insulin, which is the hormone controlling fat storage. Swings in your blood sugar lead to spikes in insulin, which ultimately effects how calories are stored as fat. Try to avoid the desserts that contain both sugar and fat since it’s the tastiness of that combination that is addictive and causes you to overeat. Instead, focus on eating fat found naturally in butter and other dairy and oils and I bet you won't overeat the fat. Some good snack options are a banana with peanut butter and nuts or whole wheat (spelt) toast with grass fed butter. Or try a full fat yogurt with some berries and local honey or homemade granola with grass fed cow or goat milk.

Focus on adding just enough fat to support your body and satisfy your appetite to keep the portion sizes and calories where they should be. In the end, fat won't make you fat!